Past Exhibitions

We are Installing
Exhibition
September 26, 2016 to October 7, 2016

Please Pardon our appearance, we are preparing the Museum for our next exhibitions:

XXc: ICONS OF PHOTOGRAPHY
 
and
 
Pairings: 16 Artists Creatively Combined

Don't miss the Members' Preview on Friday, Oct. 7, 6:00-7:30pm.

Exhibition
July 2, 2016 to September 25, 2016

People have made surfboards for centuries. Standing alone, these boards are often striking examples of functional design. Together, they tell a compelling story about the evolution of an important American art form. Traditional craft, cutting-edge engineering and minimalist art converge in the Museum’s new exhibition devoted to surfboards built from the late 1940s to the present day. Surf Craft chronicles the evolution of surfboard design featuring American makers and shapers of all kinds of wave-riding boards. It explains how meticulous hand craftsmanship can inform modern high volume commercially made surf craft.

The surfboard, historically a handcrafted object, ultimately gave rise to foam and fiberglass board construction, often produced on a mass scale. However, many contemporary shapers are now recognizing and tapping into the design principles found in the traditional boards. Cutting-edge engineering and minimalist art will converge in this exhibition.

Surf Craft originated at the Mingei Museum in San Diego, CA in 2014, where it was curated by San Diego local, Richard Kenvin. In 2015 the exhibition traveled to the LongHouse Reserve, in East Hampton, NY.

ABOUT THE CURATOR

Richard Kenvin grew up in Southern California in the 1960s. He learned to ride a skateboard in 1967 and learned to surf in 1970. In 1979 he won the Stubbies Pro, a professional surfing competition held at Blacks Beach in San Diego. By the age of 19 he had been to Hawaii several times and traveled extensively in Australia. He worked for various independent apparel designers in California in the eighties and nineties. He was curator of the 838 and Cassius King art galleries in San Diego from 2000-2005. Since 2002 he has worked with surfing historian John Elwell and designer Carl Ekstrom on the Hydrodynamica Project. In 2011 he participated in the Getty Research Institute’s Pacific Standard Time initiative as curator of Remember the Future, an exhibition of Bob Simmons’s surfboards shown in the context of mid-century California modern design. His writing has been published in the Surfers Journal and Surfer Magazine. Mr. Kenvin surfs every chance he gets on a variety of craft. He lives in downtown San Diego.

ABOUT MINGEI INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM

Located in San Diego’s Balboa Park, Mingei International Museum collects, preserves and exhibits “art of the world, art of the people,” including folk art, craft and design from all eras and cultures of the world. A non-profit institution funded by admission, individuals, and community support, the Museum offers inspiring exhibitions and diverse educational programs to more than 100,000 visitors a year. Institutional support for Mingei International Museum is provided in part by the City of San Diego Commission for Arts and Culture. 

SURF CRAFT SPONSORS

Gold Sponsors

 

Media Sponsors

       

   
   

In-Kind Sponsors

       
 

Promotional Sponsors

       
 
       
SVMA Wine Sponsor  
 

 

Exhibition
March 19, 2016 to June 12, 2016

Internationally renowned calligrapher Thomas Ingmire transgresses the boundaries of painting as well as the beauty of language in this exhibition of artist’s books, calligraphic works, drawings and sketchbooks. For many years he has collaborated with writers and artists in the production of artists’ books that combine his calligraphy with original works of art. The exhibition will illuminate the evolution of Ingmire’s calligraphic process and provide insight into the awe-inspiring world of contemporary calligraphy. 

Exhibition
March 19, 2016 to June 12, 2016

Modern Twist explores the evocative, sensual and sculptural power of contemporary bamboo art. Over the past century, the creativity and talent of bamboo basket makers has elevated their status from artisan to artist. These artists have redefined aesthetic conventions as their creations have evolved from functional vessels to increasingly sculptural objects. It brings 38 exceptional works by 17 Japanese artists, displaying many of these technically innovative and imaginatively crafted works for the first time. 

Exhibition
December 19, 2015 to March 6, 2016

Courtney Eagan and David Sullivan’s art practices span animation, sound, sculpture, photography and interactivity to explore the delicate and evolving relationship between people, technology and the environment.

Exhibition
December 19, 2015 to March 6, 2016

Both Danae Mattes and Frances McCormack meditate on nature’s elements that manifest a range of energies. Mattes combines materials and methods that are, in themselves, extracted from the earth and interacting in ways inherent to minerals, water, fibers and gravity. Combining landscape drawings, stark architectural elements and loosely interpreted botanical forms, McCormack’s paintings manifest a range of feelings reflected through the natural world in an invented space. For both artists, form is referential, but not realistic, inviting the viewer’s engagement.

Sep 12 – Dec 5, 2015
Exhibition
September 12, 2015 to December 6, 2015
Through portraiture and film, Sonoma Valley photographer Jane Baldwin gives voice to the women of the Omo River Valley of Southwestern Ethiopia and Northern Kenya. Life-size photographs and accompanying stories capture the strength and vulnerability of each woman, each a holder of her ancestral wisdom.  In the oral tradition of story telling their dignity is revealed. The exhibition, guest curated by Anne Veh, includes: an audio tour of short interviews of the Kara, Hamar, Nyangatom, Dassanech and Kwegu women; a video of Baldwin working in-situ, cultural artifacts, and a short film of a Kara woman sharing her concerns for the survival of her people. 
 

 

Sep 12 – Dec 5, 2015
Exhibition
September 12, 2015 to December 6, 2015

Prior to formal schooling, children between the ages of 5 and 10 in the small Coptic Christian village of Harrania, located at the foot of the Giza Pyramids, were selected to weave images created entirely in their mind’s eye. The joys of childhood fantasy came to life on their looms. The Egyptian Village, which up to 30 years ago had not known changes for 2000 years and had no source of income but farming, now prospers. Its tapestry artists are internationally famous and their work is prized throughout the world.

 

June 6–August 23, 2015
Exhibition
June 6, 2015 to August 23, 2015

Richard Diebenkorn is most widely known for his signature large- scale, vivid abstractions known as the Ocean Park paintings. His abstract, as well as his earlier figurative work, explores the balance between surface modulation and illusionistic depth, between the establishment of structure and its disintegration in light and space. Diebenkorn became known as one of the founders of the Bay Area figurative school. He always resisted the notion of a ‘school' in any formal sense, noting that the artists involved simply enjoyed a close association, but he led the way in developing a unique northern Californian realism.

 

April 17–May 17, 2015
Exhibition
April 17, 2015 to May 17, 2015

Alongside the American quilt exhibition, Sonoma Valley students will display their class projects that reveal the roles that shape, color, and value play in quilt patterns, and how these young artists both followed and broke the rules to create their own maverick designs. Initiated in 2000, Art Rewards the Student (A.R.T.S.) is the Museum's longest- running education program that places teaching artists in 4th- and 5th-grade classrooms throughout Sonoma Valley at no cost to the schools. 

A.R.T.S. 2014 Exhibition

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