Current Exhibitions

Exhibition
November 8, 2014 to January 25, 2015

Eleanor Coppola is a conceptual artist, documentary filmmaker, and writer based in Napa. Her artworks and collaborative installations have been exhibited in museums and galleries in the U.S. and Europe, including recent museum exhibitions in Oslo and Stockholm. She was an active participant in the Bay Area conceptual art movement of the 1970s, exhibiting and staging events at venues that included the San Francisco Art Institute, the Dante Hotel in North Beach, and other spaces. She has collaborated on installation works with fellow artists Lynn Hershman, Robbilee Frederick, Richard Beggs, and others. Eleanor Coppola’s sensibility and sensitivity to phenomena of the natural world is seen in her drawings, watercolors, photography, and sculptures that respond to and incorporate elements from her surroundings. As a documentary filmmaker, she is best known for her film “Hearts of Darkness,” which chronicled the making of her husband Francis Coppola’s film “Apocalypse Now.” This exhibition is co-curated by Kate Eilertsen and Diane Roby.

Upcoming Exhibitions

Exhibition
February 14 to May 17, 2015

Never before has there been an exhibition of maverick quilts like this one. Unconventional and Unexpected shows how primarily anonymous, often self-taught women working below the radar of the art world have often produced quilts for everyday use in their homes, that nonetheless articulate many of the same issues that have been at the core of the development of modern art during the second half of the twentieth century. The exhibition presents a selection of visually stunning pieced quilts and quilt tops from the mid to late 20th century, in a contemporary art framework. 

Exhibition
February 14 to May 17, 2015

America's oldest experiment in utopian, communal living, the United Society of Believers (Shakers) movement was founded in the 18th century. The society reached its apogee of about 6,000 members just before the Civil War and then slowly went into decline. 

Yet the Shakers have lasted longer and gained more fame than any other utopian community this country has produced. With the exhibition, we have the opportunity to look back at the origins of a unique American design aesthetic that continues to influence architects, artists, furniture makers, and product designers around the world. 

 

Exhibition
April 17 to May 17, 2015

Alongside the American quilt exhibition, Sonoma Valley students will display their class projects that reveal the roles that shape, color, and value play in quilt patterns, and how these young artists both followed and broke the rules to create their own maverick designs. Initiated in 2000, Art Rewards the Student (A.R.T.S.) is the Museum's longest- running education program that places teaching artists in 4th- and 5th-grade classrooms throughout Sonoma Valley at no cost to the schools. 

A.R.T.S. 2014 Exhibition
Exhibition
June 6 to August 23, 2015

Richard Diebenkorn is most widely known for his signature large- scale, vivid abstractions known as the Ocean Park paintings. His abstract, as well as his earlier figurative work, explores the balance between surface modulation and illusionistic depth, between the establishment of structure and its disintegration in light and space. Diebenkorn became known as one of the founders of the Bay Area figurative school. He always resisted the notion of a ‘school' in any formal sense, noting that the artists involved simply enjoyed a close association, but he led the way in developing a unique northern Californian realism.

 

Exhibition
September 12 to December 6, 2015
The exhibition presents the work of fine art photographer, videographer and sound artist, Jane Baldwin. Baldwin first became involved with the people of Ethiopia’s Omo River Valley and Kenya’s Lake Turkana in 2005 and through her photographs and interviews with them, she gives voice to people on the verge of displacement from their ancestral land. 

 

Exhibition
September 12 to December 6, 2015

Prior to formal schooling, children between the ages of 5 and 10 in the small Coptic Christian village of Harrania, located at the foot of the Giza Pyramids, were selected to weave images created entirely in their mind’s eye. The joys of childhood fantasy came to life on their looms. The Egyptian Village, which up to 30 years ago had not known changes for 2000 years and had no source of income but farming, now prospers. It’s tapestry artists are internationally famous and their work is prized throughout the world.

 

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