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Media Contact:
Celeste Smeland, Deputy Director
Sonoma Valley Museum of Art:
(707) 939-7862 csmeland@svma.org
 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:                              

 

 

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art presents
Site & Senses: The Architecture of Aidlin Darling Design Exhibition
A Multi-Sensory Exploration of the Firm’s Design Process
December 21, 2013 – March 2, 2014


 

“C-Chassis” – a 55’ long charred construct for the new exhibition

 

Sonoma Valley, CA – The Sonoma Valley Museum of Art will dedicate its entire 5,000-square-foot exhibition space to the multi-sensory explorations that guide the design process at Aidlin Darling Design. The solo exhibition, the firm’s first, will feature material palettes, models, sketches, renderings, full-scale mock-ups and photographs and videos. The focal point of the exhibition is C-Chassis, a site-specific 55-foot-long installation piece. It is through the acts of looking, listening, smelling, touching, testing, and imagining, that museum visitors can gain an understanding of the important role the senses play in the work of this award-winning design firm.  

 In his preface to the exhibition, architecture critic and writer Stanley Abercrombie sites a much quoted poem by Marcel Breuer-

Colors that you hear with ears,
Sounds to see with eyes,
The void you touch with your elbows,
The taste of space on your tongue,
The fragrance of dimensions,
The juice of stone


“In our fast-paced world, says David Darling, we can have a tendency to ignore our environment - that’s why we often pitch a tent and spend days observing both tangible and intangible qualities of the site before we start to design. It is our hope that this exhibit prompts the public to realize how good, thoughtful design can not only awaken the senses, but re-connect us to place and to ourselves.”

“Aidlin Darling’s project-specific design approach reflects its philosophy of rigorous pre-design research, intensive collaboration and reverence for the site. This exhibition gives a rare insight into a very exciting group of talented designers,” said Kate Eilersten, SVMA Executive Director & Chief Curator.

Aidlin Darling Design, a San Francisco-based award-winning firm and recent recipient of the prestigious Smithsonian Cooper-Hewitt National Design Museum’s 2013 National Design Award, is recognized for their emphasis on designing to appeal to all of the senses. Partners Joshua Aidlin, AIA, and David Darling, AIA, have cultivated a multi-disciplinary collaborative studio that acts as a creative hub for an extended network of like-minded artists, buildings, engineers, fabricators, and even chefs, in order to design and construct projects that meet their design criteria. Each project in the firm’s portfolio of private residences, restaurants, retail, and public spaces reflects a desire to uncover an inherent spirit of place and interpret constraints as catalysts for performative design. The individual character of each project emerges through poetic spatial relationships, material richness, and exacting detail.

 

About Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

With more than 1,000 members, Sonoma Valley Museum of Art is the largest visual arts organization in the San Francisco North Bay region of Sonoma, Marin, Napa, and Solano Counties. Founded in 1998, SVMA exhibits the work of local, national, and international artists such as Rodin, Rivera, Goya, and Picasso, to date staging over 100 exhibitions attracting more than 100,000 visitors. SVMA is also the leading source of art education in the Sonoma Valley Unified School District, serving more than 2,000 students annually. Its education outreach includes school tours, an annual student art exhibition, and adult art lectures and history courses. An entertainment series, social gatherings, and special events attract visitors from across the region. The museum occupies a state-of-the-art facility at 551 Broadway, just one-half block south of the historic Sonoma Plaza. The museum is open to the general public during exhibitions Wednesday through Sundays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $5 for individuals, free to the public on Wednesdays, and always free to members.

 

About Aidlin Darling Design

With a shared interest in exploring design across a wide range of scales, programs, and disciplines, Principals Joshua Aidlin and David Darling started Aidlin Darling Design in 1998 as a woodshop. Based in San Francisco, it is a multidisciplinary design firm with a broad focus, which includes institutional, commercial and residential architecture, as well as furniture, landscape and interior design.

The firm has garnered over 90 regional, national, and international awards including The 2013 National Design Award, a James Beard Award, an AIA COTE Top Ten + Award, two American Architecture Awards from the Chicago Athenaeum, an International Civic Trust Award, and several awards from the AIA, IIDA, and ASLA. For more information, please visit: http://www.aidlindarlingdesign.com/#

 

 

 

Delicious Images: Art About Food—Paintings and Works on Paper

by Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne

 

September 7­–December 1, 2013, at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

 

www.svma.org

 

4 September 2013 – Sonoma, CA:  The Sonoma Valley in northern California is known worldwide as a vibrant center for fine wines and the culinary arts. This fall, the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art (www.svma.org) highlights these regional specialties as inspiration for fine art, with Delicious Images: Art About Food—Paintings and Works on Paper by Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne. Food has always been a subject of great fascination for artists, who for centuries have  turned their gaze toward delectable pleasures in nature’s bounty, from lush 17th-century allegorical still lifes of ripe and rotting fruits to cool Pop art renderings of commercial food products. Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne skillfully and playfully capture the intrinsic beauty and essence of food. Both artists have used food as imaginative subject matter—not so much as traditional still lifes observed and rendered, but as a vehicle for exploring formal concerns and conveying an aesthetic stance or emotional state. 

 

An intimate exhibition of 22 paintings, drawings, and prints, Delicious Images: Art About Food—Paintings and Works on Paper by Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne is on view at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway, Sonoma, California, from September 7 through December 1, 2013. Museum hours are Wednesday through Sunday, 11am–5pm. Admission is $5 general; free for students grades K-12, and free for all visitors every Wednesday. More information is available at www.svma.org or by calling (707) 939-7862.

 

“Sonoma Valley Museum of Art is especially grateful to Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne for sharing their work and providing us with such an insightful exhibition,” says the museum’s Executive Director Kate Eilertsen. “Unquestionably, these two artists are dedicated to making deeply satisfying works of art, whether of food or other subjects. Clearly, what drives both of them is the promise and challenge of a fulfilling image. Seen together, they elevate a common sandwich or cupcake to a masterpiece for musing.”

 

Delicious Images: Art About Food complements Kitchen Memories: Kathleen Thompson Hill Culinary Collection, a comprehensive display of hundreds of cooking utensils, gadgets, signage, and other objects collected by Sonoma’s own culinary maven Kathleen Hill. During the exhibitions the museum will present a series of cooking programs, films and interactive projects for all ages. On Thursday, October 24th at 7pm, Museum director Kate Eilertsen will join artist Joseph Goldyne in conversation at the Museum.

 

Wayne Thiebaud is one of the most celebrated artists working today. Best known for painting everyday objects, from gumball machines to bakeshop windows, Thiebaud approaches issues of color, light, composition, and space through his signature tactile brushwork, saturated colors and carefully observed light. Although often classified as part of the American Pop art movement, Thiebaud never embraced the concept of Pop, and prefers to describe himself as a traditional painter of illusionistic form. His long-term devotion to pastel produced some of his most alluring works, and he is a master at employing the medium to achieve particularly rich and complex passages.

 

The recipient of the National Medal of Arts (1994), and the Lifetime Achievement Award for Art from the American Academy of Design, New York (2001), Wayne Thiebaud was inducted into The California Hall of Fame in 2010 at The California Museum, Sacramento. At home in Sacramento with his wife Betty Jean, Wayne Thiebaud continues painting today at age 93.

 

Joseph Goldyne has been credited as one of the artists instrumental in the rebirth of the monotype in contemporary art. His work was included in the historic 1997 exhibition, Singular Impressions, The Monotype in America, at the National Museum of American Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC. In 2001, a retrospective of his work was presented at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington DC.  Goldyne’s confidence and creativity with the pencil or brush enable him to craft works that calm, challenge and inspire.

 

Goldyne has also had a career-long affection for the creation of artist's books (livres d'artiste), beginning in 1985 with the 40th-anniversary edition of The Diary of Anne Frank, and he has collaborated with living writers, printers, and calligraphers in book projects. A selection of his artist’s books and monotypes is included this fall in Form and Expression: The Written Word at the Center for Book & Paper Arts, Columbia College, Chicago.

 

About Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

With more than 1,000 members, Sonoma Valley Museum of Art (www.svma.org, 707-939-7862) is the largest visual arts organization in the San Francisco North Bay region of Sonoma, Marin, Napa, and Solano Counties. Founded in 1998, SVMA exhibits the work of local, national, and international artists such as Rodin, Rivera, Goya, and Picasso, to date staging over 100 exhibitions attracting more than 100,000 visitors. SVMA is also the leading source of art education in the Sonoma Valley Unified School District, serving more than 2,000 students annually. Its education outreach includes school tours, an annual student art exhibition, and adult art lectures and history courses. An entertainment series, social gatherings, and special events attract visitors from across the region. The museum occupies a state-of-the-art facility at 551 Broadway, just one-half block south of the historic Sonoma Plaza. Membership fees and donations to SVMA (a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization) are tax-exempt as permitted by law. The museum is open to the general public during exhibitions Wednesday–Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $5 for individuals, free to the public on Wednesdays, and always free to members.

 

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Media Contact:                                                                                    SVMA Kate:Users:kate:Desktop:SVMAlogopumpkin800x800.jpg

Michael Coats

707-935-6203 or

Michael@coatspr.com

 

Kitchen Memories: The Kathleen Thompson Hill Culinary Collection

and

Delicious Images: Art about Food

Paintings and Works on Paper by Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne

 

September 7–December 1, 2013

 

July 15, 2013

Sonoma, CA:  For decades, a self-admittedly “quirky obsession” has compelled well-known and beloved food writer Kathleen Thompson Hill, to seek out and comb through the back roads of California amassing a unique, one-of-a-kind collection of the tools and ephemera of our kitchens. Individually and collectively, the collection pays homage and respect to the evolution of design, beauty and utility of each and every gadget used to create masterpieces of culinary delight.

From a two-century-old, hand-held wooden juicer to an equally old English cheese grater, her collection includes an abundance of culinary ephemera as diverse as restaurant menus and matchbooks to advertisements, food pamphlets, signs and food labels—all objects that provoke and evoke their own story reminding us of a simpler time in the world’s perpetually evolving attempts to speed up and improve food preparation.

Sonoma Valley Museum of Art is honored to present Kitchen Memories: The Kathleen Thompson Hill Culinary Collection. The Sonoma culinary community is at the top of the field of innovative, healthful and creative cuisine. “This exhibition will be both a nostalgic journey into our kitchen memories as well as an education about the excellent design of historic and contemporary culinary tools.” says Kate Eilertsen, Director and Chief Curator for the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

The kitchen for many is the heart of the home, with the gadgets hung on walls and hidden in drawers contributing to the full warmth associated with this part of our homes. The tools in hand and the sustenance they deliciously provide on family tables, along with the memories they evoke are represented in The Kathleen Thompson Hill Culinary Collection. Through this exhibition everyone can remember and reminisce about their personal scenery, scents, smiles and stories of the kitchen.

Food has always been a subject of great fascination for artists. Contemporary artists Wayne Thiebaud and Joseph Goldyne skillfully capture the intrinsic beauty and essence of food. These paintings and prints by Thiebaud and Goldyne will highlight the playful aspects of food, as we know it today. Six colorful paintings of cakes, candy and other fanciful food images by Thiebaud, will be seen alongside Goldyne’s series of “sandwich” paintings.   This petite but powerful exhibition will highlight Kitchen Memories: the Kathleen Thompson Hill Culinary Collection exhibition of kitchen utensils from our past to the present. 

Complementing the exhibitions will be a series of cooking programs, films and interactive projects for people of all ages.

About Sonoma Valley Museum of Art

With more than 1,000 members, Sonoma Valley Museum of Art (SVMA) (www.svma.org, 707-939-7862) is the largest visual arts organization in the San Francisco North Bay region of Sonoma, Marin, Napa, and Solano Counties. Founded in 1998, SVMA exhibits the work of local, national, and international artists such as Rodin, Rivera, Goya, and Picasso, to date staging over 100 exhibitions attracting more than 100,000 visitors. SVMA is also the leading source of art education in the Sonoma Valley Unified School District, serving more than 2,000 students annually. Its education outreach includes school tours, an annual student art exhibition, and adult art lectures and history courses. An entertainment series, social gatherings, and special events attract visitors from across the region. The museum occupies a state-of-the-art facility at 551 Broadway, just one-half block south of the historic Sonoma Plaza. Membership fees and donations to SVMA (a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization) are tax-exempt as permitted by law. The museum is open to the general public during exhibitions Wednesday through Sundays from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $5 for individuals, free to the public on Wednesdays, and always free to members.

 

 

 

October 3, 2012

LARRY THOMAS: COASTAL ECHOES

October 13–December 30, 2012

This fall, the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art hosts the exhibition Larry Thomas: Coastal Echoes, unveiling new paintings, prints and drawings by one of Northern California's most highly regarded artists. Larry Thomas is a widely-respected printmaker and painter who has been practicing in the Bay Area for over thirty years. He has left an indelible mark on the community as an artist and arts educator who served as Dean and President of the San Francisco Art Institute.  

Exhibition curator and SVMA Executive Director Kate Eilertsen has selected a range of recent works, many of which are inspired by Thomas' daily walks along the Fort Bragg coastline, near his home and studio. "Larry Thomas' new works capture the beautiful and evocative feeling of the wilderness," Eilertsen said. "They offer a way of experiencing both nature and art, with all of their fluctuating moods and contrasting themes of dissolution and permanence." The works challenge our notions of landscape, capturing the vivacity and changeability of the living world, and exploring what Thomas describes as "the intersections of site, culture and time."

After originally achieving success as a printmaker in the 1970s, Thomas has long experimented with additional media, such as drawing and painting, and incorporated these with printed elements in his work. Most recently, Thomas has turned completely to paint, creating large oil paintings that are stunning in their ability to evoke the atmospheric light of the Northern California coast. This exhibition is one of the first times these striking paintings will be publicly displayed. They represent a major departure for Thomas, who continues to surpass himself after thirty years of successful artmaking. Larry Thomas: Coastal Echoes has been generously underwritten by Mary and Michael Schuh and Dixon Long.

Also showing is The Art of Handmade Paper, which explores the history and art of papermaking around the world. Curator Simon Blattner is a noted collector of handmade paper who has also studied papermaking with experts in locations so far-flung as Tokyo, Rome and San Francisco. 

 

THE ART OF HANDMADE PAPER

October 13–December 30, 2012

The Art of Handmade Paper, offers museum-goers a rare glimpse into the fine art of papermaking. First invented in China some 2,000 years ago, handmade paper is an art form with a fascinating history and a vibrant contemporary practice. Exhibition curator Simon Blattner, himself a noted collector of handmade paper, presents a stunning collection of work, exploring links between past traditions and current practices in papermaking.

One of the exhibition's major highlights is a large display of rare Japanese papers, borrowed from the collection of Robert Seidl. Seidl, an American executive who helped revive the Japanese pulp and paper industry after World War II, has one of the most extensive collections of Japanese paper in the world; however, it is not often exhibited. This exhibition presents a rare opportunity to see some of these extremely fine examples of Japanese papermaking, dating back several centuries. One standout is a 21-foot antique scroll that illustrates the stages of the traditional Japanese papermaking process, from the gathering of mulberry bark through to the completion of Washi, the final product, a paper which was valued for its durability, utility and innate elegance. 

Intriguingly, Blattner pairs these Japanese papers with works by contemporary American papermakers. The coupling works well, suggesting links between the two bodies of work, showing how contemporary artists play with the techniques, aesthetics and values of the Japanese tradition as they carve out a future for the art of papermaking. The Japanese tenets of durability, utility and elegance are evident in many of these works, seemingly borrowed from the older tradition. But these contemporary papermakers also look to expand the limits of their medium, experimenting with an amusing variety of materials and techniques. Featured artists include Amanda Degener, Lynn Sures, John Babcock, Beck Whitehead, Helen Heibert, Michelle Wilson, Peter and Donna Thomas, and Susan Mackin Dolan.  

For all their diversity, the handmade papers on exhibition are similarly striking in their translucent beauty and delicate complexity. They will impress visitors accustomed to the industrially produced papers used in the twenty-first century. The exhibition serves to remind that paper is not a simple utilitarian technology, but also an art form of the highest order. “The Art of Handmade Paper” is exhibited in conjunction with the exhibition "Larry Thomas: Coastal Echoes." Larry Thomas is one of the Bay Area's most highly respected printmakers and painters; this exhibition includes never-before seen paintings, prints and drawings that reflect the artist's profound respect for the natural world, and confirm his reputation as a craftsman who has achieved a rare level of technical mastery in his chosen media.

 

Larry Thomas: Coastal Echoes and The Art of Handmade Paper will be on view at the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art, 551 Broadway in Sonoma, October 6 through December 30, 2012.  The Museum hours are Wednesdays through Sundays 11am– 5pm. Museum admission is $5 general; free for students in grades K-12.  Admission is free for all visitors every Wednesday.  More information about the Sonoma Valley Museum of Art is available at www.svma.org or by calling (707) 939-7862.

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